Under the tutelage of Modigliani

One day at the tender age of 14, with paint in my hair and ink on my shirt, my high school art teacher introduced me to something that would irrevocably change my life in art: Amedeo Modigliani.

“We’re studying a new artist model today,” she said as she opened the textbook like a treasure box. My eyes met with Jeanne Hébuterne, a portrait on the page; and I was instantly drawn into Modigliani’s painting and world. Ten years on, I am still under the tutelage of Modigliani, continuing to learn from and be influenced by his art.

Modigliani was born into a Jewish family; his mother descended from an intellectual, scholarly family; his father, while less culturally accomplished, from a family of successful entrepreneurs. Having read the philosophical writings of Nietzsche and Baudelaire at a young age, Modigliani soon grew to hate his bourgeois roots. He instead developed the belief that the only route to true creativity was through defiance and disorder. Turning to alcohol and drugs to create a dishevelled facade, as well as to hide his tuberculosis symptoms, Modigliani went from a well-dressed and educated artist to one of bohemian excess. Cruelly, he died from tuberculosis at the age of thirty-five.

Modigliani discarded and destroyed many of his earlier paintings that exhibited his bourgeois background, but thanks to the furious pace at which he worked, many remain from his later years –

Amedeo Modigliani-275237 amedeo_modigliani_marie leopold-zborowski-with-a-walking-stick-1917 Amedeo-Modigliani-Girl-in-a-Sailor_s-Blouse Amedeo-Modigliani-Reclining-Nude Modigliani Amedeo_Modigliani_-_Paul_Guillaume,_Novo_Pilota_-_Google_Art_Project portrait-of-a-woman-1919

To the untrained eye, it is difficult to articulate just what it is that makes Modigliani’s paintings so alluring. Upon studying them however, it becomes evident that the rich layering of texture and colour – hues of green, pink, yellow and blue – that lie behind his seemingly skin-coloured and earthy palette, are what imbue his paintings with so much significance and effect.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: